Will family agriculture survive? | Trias
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IS THERE STILL A PLACE FOR FAMILY FARMERS?

Artificial fertilisers and chemical crop protection increasingly dominate agriculture in Ecuador, including the Andes. Small-scale producers who want to maintain their independence from the agricultural industry with an alternative form of agriculture are swimming against the tide. Trias supports them.
 

Step 1: We build strong community-based organisations

In the Ecuadorian province of Tungurahua we strengthen Pacat, a co-operative that co-ordinates 34 farmers' groups with 500 ecological vegetables and fruit growers in all. Through training and workshops we invest in crop improvement. Together with the farmers' groups we also look for the most suitable organisational structure for the joint sale of their products. 

Step 2: We look for profitable markets

The Pacat members organise a weekly farmers' market in Ambato, the capital of the province of Tungurahua. They also opened their own shop to capitalise on the growing market of eco-conscious consumers who don't mind paying extra for ecologically grown fruit and vegetables.

Step 3: We interest youngsters in agriculture

Pacat organises specific training for youngsters, so that they are better prepared to run their own farm. Moreover, the youngsters exchange knowledge and experience about agro-ecological agriculture. They do that with other youngsters from across the country, and even across national boundaries. 

Thank you for helping us fulfil our dreams!

Support us, as a private individual

By making a one-off donation you support the self-development of farmers in Ecuador.

Support us, as an organisation

We would be delighted to develop a customised support package for businesses or other organisations that would like to help farmers in Ecuador move forward. Give Koen Brebels a call on +32 (0)2 548 01 26.

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